As the coronavirus pandemic has affected just about every industry, these live events have faced a pivot of almost existential proportions.

“Humans need connection,” says Talisha Brantley, community liaison at Bitwise Industries.

“And social distancing doesn’t necessarily mean social isolation.”

She borrows the quote, but the idea could be a mission statement for the No Place Like Home virtual culture festival. The free full-day event is curated and hosted by Bitwise and features everything you’d expect from an in-person festival – music, food, and market for vendors – just done remotely.

There are over a dozen musicians and DJs performing via a massive Zoom webinar, including Patrick Contreras, Hope Garcia (with the Box) and the team at Teezzy Radio. The event landed hip-hop heavy hitter Zee Will and Sagey – for underground kids. Omar Nare and Jasmin La Caris created a nuevo mariachi music and dance show especially for the event.

There will also be presentations from Revive Dance Company, the Say Bruh podcast and Tower Yoga.

The virtual marketplace will feature at least two dozen manufacturers, artisans and boutiques, including Root, Lips by BB, and Rethreaded Vintage.

On the food front, Bitwise has partnered with Fresno Street Eats, which has organized over a dozen food trucks, traditional restaurants, and breweries to have pickup and / or delivery services. The list includes Chicken Shack, Colorado Grill, Mega Texas BBQ, Tioga Sequoia, The Modernist, and Fulton Street Coffee.

“We really tried to dig in and make sure we represented a full spectrum of Fresno,” Brantley said.

A full list of artists, vendors, and food – with links to social media and the web – will be available on the No Place Like Home website (nplh.bitwiseindustries.com), which will serve as the central hub of the industry. ‘event.

The event starts at 9 a.m. and is free (although you will need to get an RSVP link to see the performances), but attendees are encouraged to donate to artists and purchase from vendors, which will be streamed live through their own Instagram accounts. during the day.

Look for specials, flash sales and more.

Just like an actual festival, the virtual festival is segmented so that A.) not everyone goes out to eat at the same time and B.) you don’t have to sit in front of their screen all day. Indeed, virtual festival-goers are encouraged to explore the fullness of the day’s experiences, Brantley says. Maybe they’ll attend a workshop in the afternoon, then grab some food and drink before heading home for a performance in the evening.

“That’s what’s fun about a festival,” she says.

“You can go in and out of these places however you want.”

Other highlights and events of the week

▪ “Staring Down the Tiger”, a virtual reading. 5 p.m. Friday, on Facebook Live, @CelebrateHmong

â–ª Madera 2 Drive In, seasonal opening. “Trolls World tour” and “Doolittle” or “Knives Out” and “The Hunt”. 8:45 p.m. and 11:10 p.m. 201 E. Lincoln Ave., Madera. $ 10 cash only. Good social distancing is enforced.

Stories about Fresno Bee

Joshua Tehee covers the latest news for The Fresno Bee, writing on a wide range of topics from law enforcement, politics and weather, to the arts and entertainment in the Central Valley.